How To Properly Store Absinthe: A Guide


These days, absinthe is making a comeback and attracting new drinkers and enthusiasts alike! It gives you a chance to experience the past as seen by people like Oscar Wilde, Vincent Van Gogh, and Ernest Hemingway.

With this much history and such a massive resurgence in popularity, many people are wondering how to properly store absinthe.

This article will give you tips on what type of glassware to use, where to store your bottle so it doesn’t get ruined by light or heat, and more!

How to Properly Store Absinthe

I’ve seen this happen all too often: someone buys an expensive bottle of absinthe only to watch as their prized possession gets ruined because they didn’t know how to properly store it. I’m here today with some helpful advice about storing your absinthe safely!

Store Your Bottles of Absinthe Upright (Not Sideways)

One common mistake people make when storing their bottles of absinthe is storing them sideways. What many don’t know, though, is that the reason you should store your bottle upright rather than on its side is that there’s a higher risk for it to leak or even break if stored improperly.

Furthermore, the absinthe can affect the cork seal, making it weaker and more likely to break.

Storing your bottles of absinthe upright will help preserve the flavor and quality for much longer!

Keep Your Bottles of Absinthe Out of Direct Sunlight

Another common mistake while storing absinthe is keeping it out in the sunlight.

It’s important that you always keep your bottles of absinthe away from direct sun as this can cause them to change color, lose flavor and quality, and even affect its alcohol content. Because absinthe’s flavor is derived from aromatic plants like wormwood, anise, and fennel, sunlight can wreak havoc on your absinthe’s flavor quality.

If your absinthe is a verte, its green color comes from chlorophyll in the botanicals used to make it. Direct light speeds up the rate that the color fades just like you would see with leaves.

Keep your favorite bottle of drinkable art hidden from the light by storing it on a shelf or cabinet with other alcoholic beverages so they’re less likely to be affected by any harmful UV rays!

Brown and green bottles are helpful at blocking UV rays from damaging the aromatic compounds in absinthe.

A high-quality absinthe is sure to be expensive, so it’s worth taking the time to make a storage area that will protect your investment for years to come.

Be Mindful of Temperature Changes

And don’t forget about temperature: make sure your storage area is between 55°-75°F (ideal humidity level) for best results or else there will be an increased risk for mold growth over time which could ruin everything you’ve worked hard to create.

Do not store in direct sunlight or anywhere with temperature fluctuations (this includes your kitchen!)

Your product deserves the same care and attention you put into creating it!

Keep Absinthe On Lower Shelves

If you are storing your absinthe bottle on a higher shelf, there is a greater chance of it falling and breaking. Needless to say, this will cause your absinthe to spill everywhere and also may ruin the shelf.

It’s perfectly acceptable to cry over spilled absinthe, but we’ll save those tears for another day!

If you are storing your absinthe on a lower shelf, there is simply less chance of it being knocked over by someone or something else.

How Long Will A Bottle Of Absinthe Keep After Being Opened?

Absinthe will keep for a long time- at least two to three years if kept in the right environment, but it can last indefinitely when stored properly.

This is because absinthe contains very high levels of alcohol (typically anywhere from 50% – 75%), which protects the drink from spoiling or going bad over time.

Once the bottle has been opened, you’ll want to make sure that you keep it corked or capped to prevent oxidization. If you plan on storing the remaining absinthe for a while, you can get special stoppers or corks for that purpose.

Personally, I’m a fan of these stoppers.

When Should You Transfer Your Absinthe To a Smaller Bottle?

As a spirit, absinthe is hardier than wine when it comes to proper storage. However, you want to be mindful that the more oxygen in the bottle, the more of an aging effect it will have on your absinthe.

Because every absinthe is different, this can have a wide variety of effects. In some, it can bring out and enhance the flavors. In others, it can cause them to break down.

Generally speaking from my own experience, when the bottle is half-empty you should transfer the remaining absinthe to a smaller bottle if you don’t plan on finishing it within the next month.

This will protect it from oxidation and ensure that it stays at its best for as long as possible.

Only use glass bottles for this. Plastic and metal containers will ruin the flavor of your absinthe!

Why You Should Not Refrigerate or Freeze Absinthe

So now that we’ve covered that absinthe should be stored in a dark and cool place, you might wonder if this means it can be kept in the freezer or refrigerator. The answer is a definite and absolute NO!

The anise flavors of absinthe (and other drinks like ouzo) come from the anethole compounds in it.

When chilling absinthe in the refrigerator or freezer, these compounds crystalize. This begins happening around 65°F (18.3°C) and can happen quickly in a 40°F refrigerator! Once these crystals are agitated, the compounds break up which will deprive you of all of that delightful flavor and, most often, the louche as well.

Because most absinthes have a very high alcohol content, the organic flavors are easily preserved. In this case, refrigerating or freezing absinthe won’t help to preserve it and will actually do much more harm than good!

Refrigerate your absinthe? Certainly not!

Conclusion – How to Properly Store Absinthe

Properly storing your absinthe is key to maintaining the delicate bouquet of flavors in it.

Fortunately, storing absinthe is fairly straight forward!

If you store your absinthe out of direct sunlight and keep it upright in a room with stable temperatures, you won’t have anything to worry about!

The Absinthe Fiend

Writer, absintheur, and cheeky devil. Don't let the name fool you! I'm actually very friendly (though a bit eccentric...)

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